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WAYSIDE ART IN EAST ANGLIA

ANIMALS

DOGS

The dog, known as man’s best friend, has often been seen as a symbol of faithfulness, protectiveness, blind love and obedience.

Above left: Dog on a pub sign at Grundisburgh in Suffolk.  Above right: One of a pair of dogs on a garden gate at Dickleburgh in Norfolk.

This weathervane in the centre of Bungay in Suffolk commemorates the Bungay dog, otherwise known to East Anglians as Black Shuck, the harbinger of death.  Often described as being as large as a small pony and with very big round eyes, stories of his terrifying hauntings have come from all parts of Norfolk and Suffolk, both along the coast from Hunstanton in the north west to Hollesley in the

South east, and inland from places as far apart as Blickling and Breckland in Norfolk to Blythburgh in Suffolk.  He appeared in Bungay in 1577 during a thunderstorm that killed several worshippers attending a service in St. Mary’s Church.  The weathervane, which was erected on the site of the old water pump in 1933, was designed by local schoolchildren in a competition.  An inscription reads:

     

   All down the church in midst of fire the hellish monster flew,

     And passing onwards to the Quire he many people slew.                  

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Above:  Sculpted head of a dog in a brick roundel on a bungalow at Gissing in Norfolk.  It was put there by former owners of the bungalow because they liked and kept dogs.

Left:  Weather vane depicting a greyhound on a garage belonging to a house in Gissing, Norfolk, the owners of which keep greyhounds.  Right: Pub sign at Tibenham in Norfolk.

Left: A collared greyhound carved in English oak on a bench-end in St. Mary’s Church in the small village of Huntingfield in Suffolk.  It represents one of the supporters on the coat of arms of the Vanneck family who were patrons here.  It dates from the mid-nineteenth century.

Right:  Wood carving of a dog on a bench-end at Bacton Church in Suffolk.