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WAYSIDE ART IN EAST ANGLIA

BUILDINGS

CHURCHES

Most villages have a church that has been the most prominent and important building in the parish for many centuries.  So it is hardly surprising that a large number of village signs depict a church as their main subject.  The following are a few examples.

Beside the church here at Yaxham in Norfolk is a man holding a scroll of paper.  He represents the poet William Cowper who died in 1800.  It was the local rector, the Rev. John Johnson, a relative of his, who brought him here.  The sign was made by Harry Carter and was presented by Mr. Temple in memory of his wife Sheila who died in 1973.

The church at Bunwell in Norfolk dates from the fifteenth century.  The bricks and tools lying in front of the church symbolise the local brick-making industry.  The sign was designed by Richard Costello and it was erected in 1992 in memory of Ron Arnold.

The church depicted on the sign at Thorpe Abbotts in Norfolk is joined by the village pump, another major feature in the centre of the village.  The sign was erected in 1992 in commemoration of the fiftieth anniversary of the arrival of the 100th Bomb Group Association USA at Thorpe Abbotts airfield.  Notice the plane at the top of the sign (left).

This black wrought-iron village sign at Bramfield in Suffolk shows the 700-year-old church tower as it stands twenty feet away from the rest of the church.

A church is depicted on a house plaque on the garden wall of the old rectory at Great Blakenham in Suffolk.

(Left)

There are two churches at Repps with Bastwick in Norfolk, one of which (at Bastwick) is now in ruins.

The wrought iron sign was made by Rodney Cranwell.

 

The church at Creeting St. Mary stands on high ground beside the River Gipping.

This cast metal sign (above) was made by Dick Gadsby. The river at Hopton, represented below the  church, is the Little Ouse.

The village sign at Coddenham in Suffolk (pictured below) was designed by Mr. Baker and made by Stuart Hill of Claydon in 1981.  The church is the main subject, but there are three motifs underneath it: a Roman Centurion’s helmet, which represents the Roman occupation here, a pig, which is the emblem of the Bacon family who built the Hall here, and the windmill, which represents the mill that was working here until the beginning of the twentieth century.

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The bridge by the church depicted in the village sign at Attlebridge crosses the River Wensum.

The village sign at Dennington in Suffolk depicts the church of St. Mary.

 

Right: The village sign at Thornham Parva in Suffolk also depicts a local church dedicated to Mary.

For information about a charity that repairs and revitalises church buildings go to the website of the National Churches Trust at: http://www.national churchestrust.org

For information on a project called ‘Art Alive in Churches’ which was started in Norfolk in 2008, go to their website at: http://www.artalive inchurches.com